Xapiri – Amazonian Video

For the Xapiri blog this August, we will be sharing a selection of our favourite video which has been created in or for the Amazon region and its people. Following our June blog on Amazonian Photography, video as like photography can be an important tool for promoting human rights, raising awareness, documenting change, anthropology study, increasing community confidence and much more.

Xapiri ourselves will be taking part in fieldwork next month as we fly to Brazil to visit some of the indigenous groups we are working with. We will be developing relationships, continuing the fair trade with the art and also producing video to give a deeper insight to the tribes we work with. We will be focusing on how the art is made but also delving deeper into the current indigenous situation from each community we visit.

We will be sharing news from our travels in Brazil and Peru for the next few months so please keep up to date via our social medial channels:

Facebook, Instagram & Twitter

Here is a selection of some of our favourite media, created from different angles and for different purposes. Sometimes created by the indigenous people themselves and other times from the outside, however they all share a common goal and have inspired us as we hope they will to you too. We must all work together to raise awareness, preserve the land and share the vast beauty and knowledge that the Amazon and its people have to offer.


Belo Monte Announcement of a War:

This is an independent documentary made during 3 expeditions at the Xingu River, Altamira, Brasília and São Paulo. It presents very serious facts about Belo Monte dam, the biggest and most polemical construction going on in Brazil today.

 

 Behind the Scenes of ‘As Hiper Mulheres’:

‘As Hiper Mulheres’ is a Brazilian documentary film, directed by Fausto Carlos, Leonardo Sette and Takuma Kuikuro. The film was shot in the Xingu National Park, Mato Grosso, Brazil. This film was a project of Video nas Aldeias (VNA, Video in the Villages). Since its beginnings, the project’s goal has been to support indigenous peoples’ struggles in order to strengthen identities and territorial and cultural heritages, through audiovisual resources and a shared production with the indigenous peoples Vídeo nas Aldeias works with.

 

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t:

“The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle,” says Mark Plotkin, “It’s the isolated and uncontacted tribes.” In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest’s indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.

 

Õkãpomaɨ – Expedition Yanomami:

A look at the current strategy of the  Yanomami as they defend their territory, the largest indigenous land in the country and one of the largest areas of protected forest in Brazil.

 

Uma casa, uma vida:

Film made by young Xavante in partnership with the collective Raiz Das Imagens from the workshops created at Santa Cruz and Belem Villages. The purpose of this video is to show the importance of the traditional masonry inside the Xavante communities.

 

Keep Oil in the Ground:

Call for an end to Amazon oil drilling! The science is clear: we have to keep two-thirds of fossil fuels in the ground to avoid catastrophic climate change, so why are we looking for more? We need to start keeping oil in the ground, and the Amazon is a great place to start. With Amazon Watch you can sign a petition here.

 

Embrace of the Serpent – Trailer:

Tracking two parallel odysseys through the Amazon three decades apart, this visionary adventure epic from Colombian director Ciro Guerra offers a heart-rending depiction of colonialism laying waste to indigenous culture.

 

If you enjoyed our setection of Amazonian media, you may like to see the Xapiri library on Youtube where many other videos are saved, from jungle sounds to old documentaries.

Until next time when we will be writing from Brazil, with peace & love,

Xapiri

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Author: Xapiri

Xapiri supports Amazonian indigenous culture by unifying ethical art, emotive photography and unbiased news. The vision is to increase awareness and inspire positive change.

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